The Role of Apex Predators - How Wolves Changed the Flow of Rivers

Preface by Rob Brewster Okay, here's a North American example of how reintroducing an apex predator can increase biodiversity. The first response that I often encounter when discussing reintroducing the Tasmanian devil, or the release of captive-bred quolls with people in Government is; "won't they eat everything". And my response is, well, no they wont. However they just may eat some of the things that are preventing many of our native mammals from thriving, namely fox cubs and kittens. By this stage whichever government beaurocrat I'm speaking with is thinking about whether raising this whole rewilding idea will piss off their boss because they're thinking too laterally, or they're already daydreaming about their next rostered day off. It's a frustratingly circular conversation.

This video, narrated by George Monbiot is a beautiful story of how 'rewilding' has helped the biodiversity recover in Yellowstone National Park. Monbiot has also recently released a book 'Feral', where he discusses whether the sterile world humans now live in has resulted in our species becoming ecologically bored. He then poses some questions on how to make it happen, and touches on the thought that maybe we will 'rewild' places because humans ultimately value a bio-diverse system over an improverished one. This guy knows what he's talking about and for $31.95, it's well worth the read. Learn more about Feral: Searching for Enchantment on theFrontiers of Rewilding by George Monbiot. Please leave your comments below...